Posts tagged rare breed mutton

Mutton selling like hot cakes

We have been going great guns recently, which is nice considering the current climate (both weather and financial). We will have some more available from the end of the week contact us at the farm for your next order.

Our regular customers have beeen raving about the recipes from michelin star chefs that the Mutton Renaissance campaign promoted. So to follow on in our series of recipes here is an amazing heart warming recipe from John Williams, Executive Chef at the Ritz.

Mutton Broth – recipe below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Brian Turner’s Braised Mutton and Caper cobbler

A hearty mid-week supper that’s delicious served on its own or with some creamy mash to soak up the juices.

SERVES: 6

 Don’t forget our Mutton Buying guide “Where to buy Mutton”

 Searching for other Mutton recipes I came accros this which looks delicious. Love to know what “mutton masala” is think I’ll have to research that one for future reference.

 

INGREDIENTS
For the Stew

  • 1kg (2.2lb) diced leg of mutton
  • 2 celery stalks, halved
  • 3 medium carrots, peeled and cut in half
  • 1/2 small swede, cut into 12 chunks
  • 6 shallots, peeled
  • 6 small turnips, scrubbed but not peeled
  • 10 whole black peppercorns
  • salt
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • 1 litre (13/4 pints) lamb stock made with 2 good quality stock cubes

For the Cobbler top

  • 350g (12oz) self raising flour
  • 100g (4oz) butter, diced
  • 50g (2oz) capers, chopped
  • 10g (1/2 oz) parsley, chopped
  • 4 spring onions, finely chopped
  • 30ml (2 tbsp) plain natural yoghurt
  • mixed with 70ml (5 tbsp) cold water.

METHOD

  1. Place the mutton in a large casserole or pan with the vegetables and herbs.
  2. Add peppercorns and season with salt.
  3. Bring to the boil and simmer gently for 1 hour.
  4. To make the cobbler rub the fat and the flour together.
  5. Stir in the capers, parsley, onions and pepper.
  6. Add enough of the yoghurt and water mix to make a soft, pliable dough.
  7. Roll dough to 2.5cm (1”) thick and cut into 12 rounds or wedges. Place on top of the mutton.
  8. Bake at 200°C, Gas 6, 400°F for 20-25 minutes or until the cobbler is golden brown

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Buy Mutton specifically for your recipe – Mark Hix’s Mutton and Turnip Pie

Director of the Ivy, Mark Hix’s Mutton and Turnip Pie.

I do a fair bit of work with the Mutton Renaissance crew and one of the best things they have done is get Michelin Star chefs from some of the best restaurants in the country to come up with some recipes worthy of this fabulous meat. They have given me all the media relating to these and I will post all five recipes here over the next few weeks. See below for Mark Hix’s Mutton and Turnip Pie

First remember to use our “where to buy Mutton” guide.

Then check out the sumptuous delight that is below. Ideal with a pint or two of local real ale. My choice would be Butty Bach by Wye Valley Brewery.

The recipe below is good with either neck fillet, tenderloin of Mutton or Diced mutton. Obviously the neck fillet and tenderloin give a more tender meat. It is importnat to buy mutton specifically to your recipe and of course we recommend rare breed mutton for the fuller flavour. It really is as good as it looks and the turnip really compliments the rich mutton flavour.

 

The filling for this simple pie is slow-cooked to help the flavours of the mutton and the vegetables combine. Serve on a cold day with buttered cabbage, boiled potatoes or mashed swede and enjoy with a fruity red wine.

 See Full recipe below.

 

 

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Mutton Recipes

I’m always on the look out for new mutton recipes. I’ll start introducing a few each month and you will be able to see every Mutton Recipe I put on here by clicking on the “Mutton Recipe” category tab on the right.

This is one I hadn’t heard of from China. Looks great and I can’t wait to give it a go, the blog is well worth a trawl through too. Some absolutely corking stuff in there:

http://helengraves.co.uk/2010/08/mutton-paomo/

Remember you can always find quality mutton if you just follow our Mutton Buying Guide.

MDAL.

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Eating Mutton

Shepherd's Pie Believe it or not we sometimes go quite a while without actually eating any of our mutton. I always seem to have extra customers come through by word of mouth and end up selling it all after each kill.

Last night we had mutton mince in a simple, proper, shepherd’s pie and it was amazing. After a few months, I forgot about the delicious smell, the texture and the fat ( I love eating the fat).

Find some mutton produced near you and make a sheherds pie the only way it’s meant to be. . . . with mutton!

MDAL

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Mutton Dressed as Lamb

Believe it or not Mutton is not always what it seems.

We are part of Prince Charles’ Mutton Rennaisance campaign. The campaign rightly draws the destintion between hogget lamb (over a year old) and Mutton (over 2 years old), but that is about it.

What about wether mutton? What about an old yow? There is an important difference in both taste and texture and therefore a difference in how you should cook them.

I know some people who sell hogget lamb as mutton (just plain dishonest) as it does take a long time to produce quality 3-4 year old mutton. But as far as I’m concerend it has to be over 3 to have the depth of flavour we all love so much.

In times when wool was worth something, wethers (castrated male sheep) were kept in numbers just for their wool. At the end of their working life they were killed for meat. As they were not produced especially for this purpose they were a scarcity and in great demand by the great and the good. Often used as a sunday best joint or for prime mutton chops.

As Mrs Beeton said:

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